Transcription

lifeA P P L I C AT I O N Study BibleTyndale House Publishers, Inc.Wheaton, IllinoisandZondervan Publishing HouseGrand Rapids, Michigan

The Life Application Study Bible, New International Version edition, is published jointly by Tyndale HousePublishers, Inc., and Zondervan. Hardcover editions are published by Tyndale House, and bonded leatherand genuine leather editions are published by Zondervan.Tyndale House Publishers gratefully acknowledges the role of Youth for Christ/USA in preparing the LifeApplication Notes and Bible Helps.The Bible text used in this edition of the Life Application Study Bible is the Holy Bible, New InternationalVersion .Life Application Study Bible copyright 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1993, 1996, 2004, 2005 by Tyndale HousePublishers, Inc., Wheaton, IL 60189. All rights reserved.Life Application is a registered trademark of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.Notes and Bible Helps copyright 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1993, 1996, 2004, 2005 by Tyndale HousePublishers, Inc. New Testament Notes and Bible Helps copyright 1986 owned by assignment by TyndaleHouse Publishers, Inc. Harmony of the Gospels copyright 1986 by James C. Galvin. Maps in textcopyright 1986, 1988, 2005 by Tyndale House Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Used by permissionof Tyndale House Publishers. Inc.Color maps copyright 2000 by Zondervan. All rights reserved.Color presentation pages copyright 2005 by Tyndale House Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved.Cross-reference system copyright 1991 by Zondervan. All rights reserved. Used by permission ofZondervan.The Holy Bible, New International Version. Copyright 1973, 1978, 1984 by International Bible Society.The “NIV” and “New International Version” trademarks are registered in the United States Patent andTrademark Office by International Bible Society. Use of either trademark requires the permission ofInternational Bible Society.The NIV text may be quoted in any form (written, visual, electronic or audio) up to and inclusive of fivehundred (500) verses without express written permission of the publisher, providing the verses quoted donot amount to a complete book of the Bible nor do the verses quoted account for 25 percent or more of thetotal text of the work in which they are quoted.Notice of copyright must appear on the title or copyright page of the work as follows:Scripture taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version . NIV . Copyright 1973, 1978, 1984 byInternational Bible Society. Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved.When quotations from the NIV text are used in nonsalable media, such as church bulletins, orders ofservice, posters, transparencies or similar media, a complete copyright notice is not required, but the initials(NIV) must appear at the end of each quotation.Any commentary or other Biblical reference work produced for commercial sale that uses the NewInternational Version must obtain written permission for use of the NIV text.Permission requests for commercial use within the U.S. and Canada that exceed the above guidelines mustbe directed to, and approved in writing by, Zondervan.Permission requests for commercial use within the U.K., EEC, and EFTA countries that exceed the aboveguidelines must be directed to, and approved in writing by, Hodder & Stoughton, Ltd., 47 Bedford Square,London WC1B 3DP, England.Permission requests for non-commercial use that exceed the above guidelines must be directed to, andapproved in writing by, International Bible Society, 1820 Jet Stream Drive, Colorado Springs, CO 80921.Copublished by:Tyndale House Publishers, Inc. ZondervanWheaton, Illinois 60189, USAGrand Rapids, Michigan 49506, USALibrary of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication DataBible. English. New International. 1997.Life application study Bible : New International Version.p. cm.Includes indexes.ISBN 0-8423-4892-1 (hardcover : alk. paper). — ISBN 0-8423-4893-X(hardcover indexed : alk. paper).I. Tyndale House Publishers. II. Title.BS195.N37 1997220.5′20814—dc21ISBN 0-8423-4892-1 HardcoverISBN 0-8423-4893-X Hardcover IndexedISBN 1-4143-0713-6 Hardcover Anniversary EditionPrinted in the United States of America09220821072006190518171697-2367

C ONT ENT SvList of the Books of the BibleviiThe NIV Cross-Reference Systemand AbbreviationsixPrefacexiiiContributorsxivA Chronology ofBible Events andWorld EventsxvWhy theLife Application Study BibleIs UniquexviiWhat Is Application?xixFeatures of theLife Application Study Bible1THE OLD TESTAMENT542A Harmony of the Books of Kings and Chronicles1517The Time between the Old and New Testaments1521THE NEW TESTAMENT1791A Harmony of the Gospels1796The Parables of Jesus1797Jesus’ Miracles andComparison of theFour Gospels1798Messianic Propheciesand Fulfillments1842Maps of Paul’s Journeys2179A Christian Worker’s Resource2193365-Day Reading Plan2197Table of Weights and Measures2199Abbreviations in the Master Index2201Master Index2299Index to Charts2303Index to Maps2305Index to Personality Profiles2307Dictionary/Concordance

L IST OF T H EBOOK S OF T H E BIBL EThe New TestamentThe Old 380388444490546NUMBERSDEUTERONOMYJOSHUAJUDGESRUTH1 SAMUEL2 SAMUEL1 KINGS2 2971 CHRONICLES2 SIASTESSONG OF S1 CORINTHIANS2 1 THESSALONIANS2026203220442 THESSALONIANS1 TIMOTHY2 121172128JAMES1 PETER2 PETER1 JOHN2 JOHN2131213421383 JOHNJUDEREVELATION

T H E NIVC ROSS-REF ERENC ESYST EMThe New International Version has one of the most accurate and best-organized crossreference systems available. The system used in this Bible contains more than 23,500references.The cross-references link words or phrases in the NIV text with counterpart Biblicalreferences listed in a side column on every page. The raised letters containing these crossreferences are set in a light italic typeface to distinguish them from the NIV text note letters,which use a bold typeface.The lists of references are in Biblical order with one exception: If reference is made to averse within the same chapter, that verse (indicated by “ver”) is listed first.In the Old Testament, some references are marked with an asterisk (*), which means thatthe Old Testament verse or phrase is quoted in the New Testament (see, for example, Genesis 1:3). The corresponding information is provided in the New Testament by the NIV textnote (see 2 Corinthians 4:6).Following is a list of abbreviations used in the cross-references:ABBREVIATIONS FOR THE BOOKS OF THE BIBLEGenesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GeExodus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ExLeviticus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LevNumbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NuDeuteronomy. . . . . . . . . . . DtJoshua. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JosJudges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JdgRuth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ru1 Samuel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1Sa2 Samuel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2Sa1 Kings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1Ki2 Kings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2Ki1 Chronicles . . . . . . . . . . 1Ch2 Chronicles . . . . . . . . . . 2ChEzra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EzrNehemiah . . . . . . . . . . . . . NeEsther . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EstJob . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JobPsalms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PsProverbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PrEcclesiastes. . . . . . . . . . . . EccSong of Songs. . . . . . . . . . . SSviiIsaiah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IsaJeremiah. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JerLamentations . . . . . . . . . . . LaEzekiel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EzeDaniel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DaHosea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HosJoel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JoelAmos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AmObadiah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ObJonah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JnhMicah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MicNahum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NaHabakkuk . . . . . . . . . . . . HabZephaniah . . . . . . . . . . . . ZepHaggai. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HagZechariah . . . . . . . . . . . . . ZecMalachi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MalMatthew. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MtMark. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MkLuke. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LkJohn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JnActs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AcRomans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ro1 Corinthians . . . . . . . . . 1Co2 Corinthians . . . . . . . . . 2CoGalatians. . . . . . . . . . . . . . GalEphesians . . . . . . . . . . . . EphPhilippians . . . . . . . . . . . PhpColossians . . . . . . . . . . . . Col1 Thessalonians. . . . . . . 1Th2 Thessalonians. . . . . . . 2Th1 Timothy . . . . . . . . . . . . 1Ti2 Timothy . . . . . . . . . . . . 2TiTitus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TitPhilemon . . . . . . . . . . . . PhmHebrews . . . . . . . . . . . . . HebJames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jas1 Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1Pe2 Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2Pe1 John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1Jn2 John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2Jn3 John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3JnJude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JudeRevelation . . . . . . . . . . . . Rev

P REF A C ETHE NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION is a completely new translation of the Holy Biblemade by over a hundred scholars working directly from the best available Hebrew, Aramaicand Greek texts. It had its beginning in 1965 when, after several years of exploratory studyby committees from the Christian Reformed Church and the National Association of Evangelicals, a group of scholars met at Palos Heights, Illinois, and concurred in the need for anew translation of the Bible in contemporary English. This group, though not made up ofofficial church representatives, was transdenominational. Its conclusion was endorsed by alarge number of leaders from many denominations who met in Chicago in 1966.Responsibility for the new version was delegated by the Palos Heights group to a self-governing body of fifteen, the Committee on Bible Translation, composed for the most part ofBiblical scholars from colleges, universities, and seminaries. In l967 the New York Bible Society (now the International Bible Society) generously undertook the financial sponsorshipof the project—a sponsorship that made it possible to enlist the help of many distinguishedscholars. The fact that participants from the United States, Great Britain, Canada, Australia,and New Zealand worked together gave the project its international scope. That they werefrom many denominations—including Anglican, Assemblies of God, Baptist, Brethren,Christian Reformed, Church of Christ, Evangelical Free, Lutheran, Mennonite, Methodist,Nazarene, Presbyterian, Wesleyan, and other churches—helped to safeguard the translation from sectarian bias.How it was made helps to give the New International Version its distinctiveness. The translation of each book was assigned to a team of scholars. Next, one of the Intermediate Editorial Committees revised the initial translation, with constant reference to the Hebrew,Aramaic, or Greek. Their work then went to one of the General Editorial Committees, whichchecked it in detail and made another thorough revision. This revision in turn was carefullyreviewed by the Committee on Bible Translation, which made further changes and then released the final version for publication. In this way the entire Bible underwent three revisions, during each of which the translation was examined for its faithfulness to the originallanguages and for its English style.All this involved many thousands of hours of research and discussion regarding themeaning of the texts and the precise way of putting them into English. It may well be that noother translation has been made by a more thorough process of review and revision fromcommittee to committee than this one.From the beginning of the project, the Committee on Bible Translation held to certain goalsfor the New International Version: that it would be an accurate translation and one thatwould have clarity and literary quality and so prove suitable for public and private reading,teaching, preaching, memorizing, and liturgical use. The Committee also sought to preservesome measure of continuity with the long tradition of translating the Scriptures into English.In working toward these goals, the translators were united in their commitment to theauthority and infallibility of the Bible as God’s Word in written form. They believe that itcontains the divine answer to the deepest needs of humanity, that it sheds unique light onour path in a dark world, and that it sets forth the way to our eternal well-being.The first concern of the translators has been the accuracy of the translation and its fidelityto the thought of the Biblical writers. They have weighed the significance of the lexical andgrammatical details of the Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek texts. At the same time, they havestriven for more than a word-for-word translation. Because thought patterns and syntaxix

differ from language to language, faithful communication of the meaning of the writers ofthe Bible demands frequent modifications in sentence structure and constant regard for thecontextual meanings of words.A sensitive feeling for style does not always accompany scholarship. Accordingly theCommittee on Bible Translation submitted the developing version to a number of stylisticconsultants. Two of them read every book of both Old and New Testaments twice—once before and once after the last major revision—and made invaluable suggestions. Samples ofthe translation were tested f